Q&A Thursday with Joseph Christiano

Today’s Q&A is with fellow Wild Child Publishing Author Joseph Christiano!

Enjoy & Comment.

What is the worst
thing you’ve written, how did you learn or know it was bad, and what did you
learn from it?
I wrote a short story when I was 13 years-old.  What more do you need to know?
Why did you start
writing and when did you decide to go professional?
I wrote on and off all through my teens.  I didn’t get “serious” about it, though,
until maybe five years ago.  I didn’t so
much decide to go professional as I was lucky enough to find a publisher who
allowed me to go professional.
Do you write in more
than one genre? Which ones and which do you like the best?
I like to stay in the horror/suspense genre because that
appeals to me as a reader.  I’m a huge
fan of genre mash-ups.  Military/horror,
or scifi/crime noir, that kind of thing. 
It’s the literary equivalent of “Your chocolate is in my peanut
butter!”  As long as they taste great
together, why not put two different tastes together?
   
Do you read other
author’s books when you’re writing? If so, do you read the same genre or
something different?
I’m always reading. 
For fiction it’s usually horror/suspense but not always.  I’m always up for something
well-written.  Unless it’s paranormal
romance.  Sorry, but that’s been done to
death.  For non-fiction I prefer history
and maybe a biography if it’s about someone I find fascinating.   
What is the most
difficult part of the entire writing process for you? Queries, pitches,
editing..etc
The whole thing is difficult!  If it wasn’t everyone would do it.  I guess my least favorite part is coming up
with a killer idea for the story after it’s finished with the editing process
and is being readied for publication. 
I’ve said, “Oh, man, I should have done that!” a few times.  
If you could have the
same type of career as any author currently publishing who would it be and why?
That’s a loaded question. 
There are too many variables on which to base my choice.  Do I want financial security?  Fame? 
Fans?  The satisfaction of having
created something that will (hopefully) outlive me?  All of the above?  Too tough to answer. 
Author’s Bio: I have been a lifelong reader of both fiction
and non-fiction.  My favorite genres in
fiction are mystery, suspense, horror, and science fiction.  My non-fiction affinity is for history
books.  My favorite and most influential
authors are Stephen King, Alan Moore, Harlan Ellison, Richard Matheson, Stan
Lee, Edgar Allan Poe, Agatha Christie, Neil Gaiman, and Michael Jan Friedman
(who used me as a character in one of his Star
Trek
novels).
My premiere novel, The
Last Battleship
, was published by the fine (and intelligent) folks at Wild
Child Publishing in March 2012.  My
second novel, Moon Dust, is scheduled
for release December 2012 by Crescent Moon Press.
 The Last Battleship - Click Image to Close
In 1944, the battleship USS Louisiana is torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine. There is a single survivor. Four decades later, an expedition embarks to locate and document the wreck. The Louisiana’s sole survivor, Ensign Robert Sayles (retired), along with his daughter, Jill, are honored guests of the expedition.
But things begin to go wrong aboard the research vessel Hailey
Rose. Several crewmen are found murdered, and the ship’s radio and engines are
sabotaged. The pain from wounds Robert Sayles received in his escape from the
sinking battleship return to haunt him. With a fierce South Pacific storm
bearing down on them, the Hailey Rose’s survivors must find a way to
repair their vessel and contend with a murderer in their midst. A murderer with
direct ties to the night the last battleship was sunk.
Is it Robert? Or is it… something else? And will they
survive…The Last Battleship?

Q&A Thursday with Cathy Tully!

Today’s Q&A Thursday is with Author Cathy Tully!

Enjoy & Comment!

What is the worst
thing you’ve written, how did you learn or know it was bad, and what did you
learn from it?
Well, that would have to be my first book, which I could
never sell. When I go back and look at it now, eight years later, I actually
laugh. But writing is a learning process, and with every book you write, you
get better : )
Why did you start
writing and when did you decide to go professional?
I started writing children’s non-fiction eight years ago.
When I turned that book in, Kidhaven Press decided that since Library sales
were so low, they were only going to use in-house authors…..so I turned to
romance and have been writing it since : )
Do you write in more
than one genre?
Which ones and which
do you like the best?
Yes, I do! I write, sweet romance, women’s fiction and
contemporary romance. I’d have to say women’s fiction is my favorite genre.
Maybe it’s because of my age, but I relate to that genre best.
Do you read other
author’s books when you’re writing? If so, do you read the same genre or
something different?
I’m always reading other author’s books. When I’m in the
middle of a new book, or starting a new book. I read mostly the genre’s I want
to write, but what I’m reading doesn’t necessarily have to be the genre I’m
currently writing in. 
What is the most
difficult part of the entire writing process for you? Queries, pitches,
editing..etc.
I find the waiting period awful! I’d rather have tooth
extracted without sedatives than wait another six months for a response. I’ve
gotten better at it, but still, I can’t stand it.
If you could have the
same type of career as any author currently publishing who would it be and why?
Lori Wilde or Kristin Higgins.   I love their books, and hope to one day join
them on the NYTimes Bestseller list J

Book Blurb: ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE

Jack DeVane is on the fast tract to becoming CEO of
Cunningham Coffee and nothing will get in his way…until a little dog wanders
into his condo and a beautiful dog walker wanders into his heart.
Caitlyn Stiles has one wish–to take over the family
business. When she returns from college and this is no longer an option, she
travels to Promise, Massachusetts to look after her ailing grandmother where
she takes a job as a part-time dog walker.
Can one sweet, little dog teach Jack there’s more to life
than work?
Teach Caitlyn to let go of her resentment?
And teach them both that ALL THEY NEED IS LOVE?
Author’s Bio: Cathy Tully has spent the last
eight years writing Sweet Romance, Contemporary Romance and Women’s Fiction.
Prior to romance, she wrote a children’s non-fiction book titled, NEBRASKA for
Kidhaven Press in 2004.. Her first Sweet Romance, ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE, is
available this June through Astraea Press.
A Member of Romance Writer’s Of
America, The Liberty States Fiction Writer’s, and The Society of Children’s
Book Writer’s and Illustrators, Cathy is a firm believer in continually honing
her craft. Cathy can be found on Facebook and at www.cathytully.com. A born and bred
Jersey girl, Cathy lives in central New Jersey with her husband, Joe, and their
two daughters.

Q&A with Author E.A. Setser

Today’s Q&A Interview is with author E.A. Setser.

Enjoy & Comment!
What is the worst thing you’ve written, how did you learn or know it was bad, and what did you learn from it?
This one could go two ways. The worst book I’ve ever written was Fate, a project I worked on from age 11 to age 13. It was about a group of human adolescents traveling to another world and participating in a war between a voodoo warrior, aided by a medicine man, and a demonic arch-mage with a pet minotaur. It was excessively campy, but I wrote it intending to be serious.

The worst I’ve written for my age was Prophecy Nocturne, the first book I completed a draft of. It was about a modern mystical struggle to keep a shape-shifting demon from merging a new Circle of Hell with Earth and damning everyone, thus greatly skewing the spiritual Balance. I finished it when I was 21 or 22, but when I got halfway through the first re-read edit, I realized it was full of plot holes and just poorly executed. Cool idea horribly done.
I learned a lot about character development, self-criticism, and story planning through those experiences. One of my biggest faults was in not planning a sturdy framework for the meta-story. So, I had to implement changes as new ideas came up, which meant the final product was an inconsistent mess.
Why did you start writing and when did you decide to go professional?
Do you remember why you did the things you did when you were four years old? No, seriously, I learned to write complete sentences and got this insatiable urge to write stories pretty soon after. When I was writing Prophecy Nocturne, I decided I wanted to make a living off of my writing. Fortunately, I started holding myself to higher standards before I went slapping my name on whatever I pulled out of my butt. Haha!
Do you write in more than one genre? Which ones and which do you like the best?
I’ve only got one series going – it’s kind of my Mount Rushmore – but I’ve never been able to pigeonhole even one book in it as just one genre. Fantasy figures prominently, but it’s sort of modern fantasy with elements of sword-and-sorcery and mild sci-fi thrown in. I call it industrial fantasy.

But it also includes elements of suspense, thriller, criminal drama, political drama, conspiracy, war, comedy, romance, etc. Not to say it’d ever be shelved as any of those in a bookstore, but the elements are there and integral to the story as a whole. It’s something of a sandbox epic.
Do you read other author’s books when you’re writing? If so, do you read the same genre or something different?
When I do that, I subconsciously try to emulate styles or even copy scenarios and character elements in my own writing. So I make a point to avoid it now.
What is the most difficult part of the entire writing process for you? Queries, pitches, editing..etc.
Marketing. I’m not a people person, and it shows. Most of what I say comes off as abrasive. A lot of people take my input as insulting, even when I’m biting my tongue and keeping my criticism strictly constructive. It’s not exactly good for public relations, but it does attract a certain kind of audience in itself.
If you could have the same type of career as any author currently publishing who would it be and why?
James Patterson. I’m none too familiar with his work, but I know he’s widely successful and generally respected as a writer. You don’t see that combination often.
Author’s Bio: After spending most of his life failing to gain footing in Knoxville, TN, E. A. Setser and his family packed their life into a truck and set their sights on Cincinnati, OH. Being nearsighted, his aim was a little off, and they landed 2 miles short in Covington, KY. But in the spirit of America, they got a rental house with some friends and decided to settle there anyway. Now, he works as a cost estimator, purchaser, machinist, and database administrator for a local sign manufacturing company. He also has an Associate’s degree in Accounting, sort of.
As for writing, E. A. got started at the age of 4, writing short stories for his family. Seven years later, he tried writing a novel for the first time and failed. Another few years later, he tried again, keeping many of the same elements, and scrapped the 540-page end result because it sucked. It wasn’t until he was 28 years old that he finished a novel he was proud enough of to publish under his real name. Elder Blood is the first of seven novels in his The Epimetheus Trial series, and it has nothing to do with vampires, so don’t even ask. Seriously.
 Elder Blood chronicles a military superpower’s quest for autonomy by driving its neighbors into obsolescence. This ambitious pursuit is enabled and empowered by The Avatars of Fate, an obscure organization with technological offerings beyond the most advanced civilizations. In the shadows of their ascent, federal officials are left blind to the rebellion building around their feet as splinter groups — including some unsuspected persons of interest — converge under a common purpose.
Casual mentions of gods and deities by The Avatars of Fate raise suspicions in an otherwise agnostic world. Equally suspicious is the fact that their emergence coincides with the reappearance of an alternate line of hominids thought to have met with extinction several centuries ago. These Hybrids are imbued with inhuman traits and capabilities, perhaps a driving force behind the vendetta issued against them. Every move is awash in possibility, and every new answer brings a wealth of intrigue in this heady epic.
Visit E.A. online: 
Buy Link
CreateSpace discount code: (T6HSQ2WG for $1 off)