Q&A Thursday with Paul Flewitt

Today’s Interview is with Author Paul Flewitt! 
What is the worst thing you’ve written, how did you learn or
know it was bad, and what did you learn from it?
Oooh, getting right into the bone of the matter…I like it!
I’ve written some pretty bad poetry in my time. I started
out writing poetry as a youngster, so all that stuff would be utter rubbish.
More recently, I seem to feel if a piece I’m writing is good or not, and I have
a great group of beta readers who help me get things right. I read a lot in my
spare time, so pretty much I’m self-taught as far as good or bad and my idea of
what is which.
Why did you start writing and when did you decide to go
professional?
I’ve been imaginative for about as long as I can remember
and my parents taught me to read and write as soon as I was able to speak, so
in that respect I guess I’ve always written. My first memory of writing with
purpose was a poem I wrote as a youngster called “The Dead School”. I decided
to go professional, if that’s what I am, around late 2012/early 2013.
Do you write in more than one genre? Which ones and which do
you like the best?
I have only released in the horror genre, but I don’t rule
out writing in the fantasy or sci-fi areas. I’m not a guy who ever says never;
but I think it’s safe to say I’m never going to do a Jilly Cooper or Barbara
Cartland style story. I do think that anything I write will probably be
prefixed with the word “dark”.
 I have to admit to
enjoying the horror genre. It’s the genre I enjoyed reading best throughout my
life, so it’s no surprise that I would enjoy writing in that style. What I also
find, though, is a really diverse and supportive community which exists out in
the world. Fans of horror tend to be rabid in their following, and they’re such
a fun group of people…weird to say, I know…but horror people are some of the
funniest people around!
Do you read other author’s books when you’re writing? If so,
do you read the same genre or something different?
I don’t not read, or I’d never read a book again. I read
whatever I feel like at the time and go through various moods as far as books I
read is concerned.
What is the most difficult part of the entire writing
process for you? Queries, pitches, editing..etc.
Synopsis and blurb writing; no doubt about it. It’s the
devil’s own work.
If you could have the same type of career as any author
currently publishing who would it be and why?

That’s a great question… it’d have to be a combination of
three different authors if we’re talking real dream sequence stuff. I’d love to
have the profundity and the lifestyle of Clive Barker, he seems to have a lot
of fun, makes some great movies, writes and paints. He is a complete artist.
The other is Stephen King, simply because of his commercial success. Anyone who
says they don’t want to make a good living from their writing is a liar. Yes,
the art is important to me; but I also have a mortgage to pay and mouths to
feed.

Paul Flewitt lives in Sheffield, UK with his partner and their two children. He is a writer of horror and dark fiction with JEA press. 


Paul is the author of “Smoke” a flash fiction which appeared in OzHorrorCon’s Book of Tribes anthology, “Paradise Park” from JEA’s All That Remains anthology and the stand alone novella “Poor Jeffrey” through CHBB’Vamptasy press. He continues to work on further pieces…
Smart url for Amazon book page; http://smarturl.it/PoorJeffrey

Q&A Interview with Steve McHugh

Today’s Q&A is with Author Steve McHugh!

Enjoy & Comment.
What is the worst thing you’ve written,
how did you learn or know it was bad, and what did you learn from it?
The worst thing
I’ve ever written was when I was about 13 and I wrote a very short story that
if Terry Pratchett had read it, he’d have sued me for plagiarism. It was awful,
although the writing of it taught me to find my own style, so it was also very
useful.
Why did you start writing and when did
you decide to go professional?
I’ve been writing
since I was very young, maybe 9 or 10, and then from about 16- 21 I would write
bits here and there, but never get anything finished. My daughter was born when
I was 25 and that’s when I decided to get serious about it. I sat down and
wrote a book called, For Past Sins, that will never ever be published. But
after finishing it, I knew a lot more than I had before. I started Crimes
Against Magic then and once that was finished decided it was good enough to
publish. The day the book went onto Amazon, I knew I was hooked for life.
Do you write in more than one genre?
Which ones and which do you like the best?
I have an idea
for a Steampunk story and one for a full on epic fantasy, oh and an historical
fantasy too, but at the moment I’m writing my Urban Fantasy Hellequin books,
and making notes of the others when I get chance. Right now, Urban Fantasy is
my favourite. When I get round to writing the other books, I imagine that will
change depending on the day.
Do you read other author’s books when
you’re writing? If so, do you read the same genre or something different?
As I’m writing,
or thinking about writing, quite a lot, I have no choice but to write and read
together. I tend to pick up whatever looks good at the time, although since
I’ve started writing, my reading has dropped. Unfortunately this has meant my
backlog of books is ever growing. One day, I’ll make a dent.
What is the most difficult part of the
entire writing process for you? Queries, pitches, editing..etc.
I hate synopsis.
Hate them with an earthly passion. They suck. And I told my editor this when I
got my contract. Apparently everyone hates them, so it’s nice to know I’m not
alone in my feelings.
If you could have the same type of career
as any author currently publishing who would it be and why?
Neil Gaiman. His
work in comics, TV, movies and books (both children and adult) is quite diverse
and I think that’s something I’d like to be able to say I did. Also, he’s
wildly successful. That’d be nice too.
Optional:
Author Bio: Steve’s
been writing from an early age, his first completed story was done in an
English lesson. Unfortunately, after the teacher read it, he had to have a chat
with the head of the year about the violent content and bad language. The
follow up ‘One boy and his frog’ was less concerning to his teachers and got
him an A.
It
wasn’t for another decade that he would start work on a full length novel that
was publishable, the results of which was Crimes Against Magic.
He was born in a small
village called Mexbrough, South Yorkshire, but now lives with his wife and
three young daughters in Southampton.
Crimes Against Magic:
Hellequin
Chronicles: Book 1
How do you keep the people you care about safe from enemies you
can’t remember?
Ten years ago, Nate Garrett awoke on a cold warehouse floor with
no memory of his past—a gun, a sword, and a piece of paper with his name on it
the only clues to his identity. Since then, he’s discovered he’s a powerful
sorcerer and has used his magical abilities to become a successful thief for
hire. 
But those who stole his memories aren’t done with him yet: when
they cause a job to go bad and threaten a sixteen-year-old girl, Nate swears to
protect her. With his enemies closing in and everyone he cares about now a
target for their wrath, he must choose between the comfortable life he’s built
for himself and his elusive past. 
As the barrier holding his memories captive begins to crumble,
Nate moves between modern-day London and fifteenth-century France, forced to
confront his forgotten life in the hope of stopping an enemy he can’t remember.
  
Born of Hatred:
Hellequin
Chronicles: Book 2
There are some things even a centuries-old sorcerer hesitates to
challenge…
When Nathan Garret’s friend seeks his help investigating a bloody
serial killer, the pattern of horrific crimes leads to a creature of pure
malevolence, born of hatred and dark magic. Even with all his powers, Nate
fears he may be overmatched. But when evil targets those he cares about and he
is confronted by dire threats both old and new, Nate must reveal a secret from
his recently remembered past to remind his enemies why they should fear him
once more.
Born of Hatred, set in modern London with historical flashbacks to America’s Old
West, continues the dark urban fantasy of Crimes
Against Magic
, the acclaimed first book in the gritty and action-packed
Hellequin Chronicles.

Q&A Thursday with K A Davur

Today’s Interview is with author K A Davur.

Enjoy & Comment!

What is the worst
thing you’ve written, how did you learn or know it was bad, and what did you
learn from it?
  Like most writers, I
have this old folder of angsty teenaged po-e-treeeeee that makes me cringe,
especially when I remember that I actually read most of it aloud at various
events.  The raw emotion does have to be
respected, to some degree, though. 
Maybe. 
Why did you start
writing and when did you decide to go professional?
I’ve never not written. 
I have diaries from when I was in Kindergarten or earlier filled with
stories.  I still remember the first time
I was recognized and singled out for my writing, which was in first grade.  They created a beast!  I took nearly a decade off from writing;
people go out of their way to tell aspiring artists of any sort all of the
reasons that we will never, ever make it. 
It gets so discouraging and effectively strangles one’s muse.  While I’d like to strangle my muse at times
(her name is Cecelia and she’s a fickle little monster), I think that’s one of
the greatest disservices we do our children. 
Help them dream; they will discover reality on their own. 
Do you write in more
than one genre? Which ones and which do you like the best?
  I have written a great deal of non-fiction in
the past.  I used to be a doula and a
midwife, and was published in some professional journals.  I’m surprised at how much I incorporate the
knowledge I gained there in my work now, though I guess it makes sense.  Birth is a naturally dramatic event!  Now, though, I’m writing speculative
fiction.  The novel that was just
released was a vampire themed comedic thriller for kids.  My next two are for adults. 
Do you read other
author’s books when you’re writing? If so, do you read the same genre or
something different?
  I cannot read
my same genre.  Either I start to
subconsciously mirror their writing, or I get intimidated.  I’m always reading something, though.  Right now I’m reading “Raising Riley” by
Brick Marlin and “The Others” by Thomas Tryon.
What is the most
difficult part of the entire writing process for you? Queries, pitches,
editing..etc.
The hardest part for me is anything that is technologically
based.  I’m a bit of a Luddite!  I write everything in comp books that I buy
when they are on super clearance for back to school.  I’ve always said that a notebook is an
invitation but a cursor is a demand!  The
moment comes, though, that I have to actually type it up and edit it and that’s
when the problems begin. I take care of all of my own publicity, which means
pinterest, twitter, a website, goodreads, etc., so I’ve had to learn
quickly.  I’m not good, yet, but I’m at
least proficient. 
If you could have the
same type of career as any author currently publishing who would it be and why?
  Kevin Smith! 
He gets to go to cons and hang out with all the same amazing geeky folks
as I, but THEY pay HIM.  They seek HIM
out.  That would be awesome!
@k_a_davur